Diplomacy and Empathy

A good diplomat will always try to put himself in the position of the person with whom he is negotiating, to understand his objectives and needs, and try to imagine what he would wish, do, and say, under those circumstances.

— Satow’s Diplomatic Practice

God’s Justice

God is just; of this I am sure, it is a consequence of his goodness; man’s injustice is not God’s work, but his own; that moral injustice which seems to the philosophers a presumption against Providence, is to me a proof of its existence. But man’s justice consists in giving to each his due; God’s justice consists in demanding from each of us an account of that which he has given us.

— Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile

The Nuances of Diplomacy

Diplomatists are specialists in precise and accurate communication. They are more than mere couriers or heralds; they are experts in detecting and conveying nuances of international dialogue, are equipped not merely to deliver a message but to judge the language in which it should be couched, the audience to whom and the occasion at which it should be presented.

–Hedley Bull

Diplomacy and Peace

The diplomat possesses a dignitas, which derives from the state he or she represents. We speak of war diplomacy in awareness that the activity does not and arguably must not cease during wartime, which creates its own problems of diplomacy. It is usual, however, to think of diplomatic activity as a branch of politics in the service of peace and not war. Diplomats, at their best, are peacemakers and peace-preservers rather than warmongers. Classical diplomacy, Martin Wight’s phrase, is a civilized and civilizing activity.  — Robert Jackson

Pope Francis: Charity is the only acceptable kind of fanaticism

Today, Pope Francis said that the only acceptable kind of fanaticism is that of “charity.”

“Any other type of fanaticism does not come from God, and is not pleasing to him,” Pope Francis stated. “True faith is one that makes us more charitable, more merciful, more honest and more humane … it makes us see the other not as an enemy to be overcome but a brother or sister to be loved, served and helped.”